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Egypt: Man hurls Molotov cocktail at Greek Orthodox church in Alexandria

Persecution of Christians in Egypt: this attack at Holy Virgin and Mar-Girgis (St George) Greek Orthodox Church in Ghabrial, Alexandria is a new reminder that the Christians of Egypt are persecuted on a nearly daily basis for their faith in our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, often with attacks on individuals such as this one.

Not only the Copts, but also our 300,000 Greek Orthodox brothers and sisters in Egypt suffer sporadic persecution, discrimination, and harassment, and as we see so often, frequently Egyptian officials do little or nothing to alleviate their plight. This story points out that “the government expresses bias against Christians, and this encourages the broader national community to do the same, sometimes leading to the desecration of places of worship.” Christians have little hope of redress from that same government: although the perpetrator in this case was arrested, he may escape punishment altogether not just because of mental instability, but because of an official unwillingness to prosecute such crimes.

For previous ChristianPersecution.com coverage of the persecution of Christians in Egypt, see here.

“Attempted Attack at Orthodox Church in Egypt,” International Christian Concern, May 30, 2020:

05/30/2020 Egypt (International Christian Concern) – On May 16th, an unnamed man reportedly hurled a Molotov cocktail at a Greek Orthodox church in Egypt’s northern city of Alexandria. The incident resulted in no casualties or damages to the church. Police identified the attacker and arrested him.

The attacker is a previous patient at a mental health hospital in Egypt. After being placed on trial, prosecution is ordering a medical examination to determine whether or not the perpetrator can be held responsible for his actions. Attacks on Egyptian Christians and their houses of worship are often dismissed as mental instability, even in cases of attempted homicide. While in some cases it may be a legitimate claim, it is most often used to hide persecution.

…The government expresses bias against Christians, and this encourages the broader national community to do the same, sometimes leading to the desecration of places of worship.

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